Posts Tagged: Kocialski

Book Review: Start Up from the Ground Up (Paperback)

This book begins by dispelling the common misconception that technology and social networking is the main component of business start-ups. The author tells the reader that her book will “detail strategies and techniques for success,” so that you already are aware that this is more than the regular fly-by-night self-help book. Cynthia Kocialski’s focus is on helping to transform an idea into a business that will last.

Kocialski breaks her book up, not into chapters, but topics including: common questions or situations fledgling entrepreneurs face during their initial start-up period. Kocialski also explains how entrepreneurs act in and outside of a business setting and how they possibly see themselves or fit within certain business frameworks. She notes and makes an active point that start-ups and businesses will not always run as planned. In addition, she is very detailed in her explanations of the book’s major topics and takes care in making sure her audience and other readers thoroughly understand their role as entrepreneurs.

As a reader, I felt that Kocialski took the time to address any concerns or doubts I might have had about starting a business. Also, the short sections helped to keep me interested and looking forward to the next tip to come. Throughout the book, there is an emphasis on technology and technological products. Kocialski makes sure to guide the reader through looking at the details of their business plan and what many investors may focus on. Also, when considering investing in a company, she stresses the importance of teamwork. Overall the section on investors is very compelling and an eye-opener.

Kocialski takes the time to define each of her topics, such as marketing, advertising, funding, and customer profiling. In addition, her use of anecdotes makes reading the book more enjoyable. Although her sections and details may seem repetitive, each one brings a different perspective and provides deeper insight into the world of start-ups.

Kocialski uses language that the average American can relate to and understand. There is a feeling of ease as the book proceeds from topic to topic. Unlike many “self-help” books, Start Up from the Ground Up does not use “suit and tie” language that is unappealing to most audiences, but rather conversational language that guides the reader from the beginning to the finish line. She seems to want to be eager to relate as much as possible to her audience.

Kocialski does not stray far from her own personal style. There is not much to elaborate on because it is a 214-page self-help book. It may be a bit friendlier in its writing style than most self-help books in describing its concepts but is still very straightforward. Start Up from the Ground Up brings the reader from start to finish thoroughly, hitting, major and minor points. There is a reoccurring theme of technology throughout her book which could possibly discourage the reader from starting a business that strays from a business start- up not focusing on technology as its main theme. There is a summarizing chapter, but there is not necessarily a conclusion. The book just seems to end on the ground level.